A simple exercise for being with climate change

Here’s a simple exercise that will give you some useful information about how you’re viewing and feeling about climate change, or deep adaptation. (Deep adaptation is the art of having a heartfelt and engaged response to the notion that climate change might very well not be “fixable,” but rather a reality that we’re learning to live with.) The exercise takes only five or ten minutes and is safe and revealing. Take a few moments and try it.

Choose an object in your room to represent climate change (or deep adaptation) and put it where you can stand over or beside it. Put another object down to represent yourself, a pair of shoes for example. Put the object that represents you the distance away from “climate change” that feels right to you and stand in that place and consider climate change. Notice how your body feels contemplating it, how you feel. Take a little time to allow yourself to land here. Jot a few thoughts down if you like.

Then take the position of climate change and consider “you,” where you just were. Notice how it feels from there, and jot it down if you like.

When you’re ready go back to the first position and feel how that is, considering climate change. Notice anything that’s new or that’s true, or that you might want to do.

And that’s it, your through!

I’ve created an online event to do this in a group, [changed to]Sunday July 14th. We’ll do the exercise individually, then share what happened in small groups. We’ll alternate between the small group and the larger group as we¬† consider what we’re hearing, how it is for us, and what we’re learning.

Please reply to this email and I’ll make sure you have all the details to attend the call.

8 thoughts on “A simple exercise for being with climate change

  • June 7, 2019 at 3:31 am
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    Interesting and useful exercise Andrew. The realisation that came more strongly is the one that I have been living with for some years now. Ultimately it is death that’s in charge of my life, not me, and death’s not for shifting. That isn’t fatalism for me. Everything must end in the end. My end and that of everything and everyone that I love is now living with me every day. My task is to know death, to make it my friend, and to do it well. I will make it my legacy for all those around me who will watch me do it.

    Thanks for the Insight Andrew.

  • June 7, 2019 at 7:55 am
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    Beautifully said, John. That is indeed a legacy for those around you. We’re mutually encouraging, helping, and teaching each other to do show up and meet this time well.

  • June 7, 2019 at 8:16 am
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    Nice exercise. Sign me up for July 7th. Thanks, Betty

  • June 7, 2019 at 8:38 am
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    Thank you Andrew, very interesting. I wasn’t sure what to expect but it brought new insight of how we are one with climate change….it is us and we are it.

  • June 7, 2019 at 8:26 pm
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    Thank you Andrew.
    Please sign me up for the July 7th event. Cheers

  • June 12, 2019 at 1:37 pm
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    I”m just loving you right now Andrew, the courage and creativity and deep dedication of your soul.

  • July 7, 2019 at 10:29 am
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    Well … well, I am very close to the dried leaves symbolizing a block in nature deriving from climate change. My perspective is that we should support the States and individuals trying to limit the increase of CO2 (COP21). So, I am not ready to say it cannot be fixed! I am ready to say that some of it can be fixed and some probably not.
    Sign me in for the 14th of July!
    Thanks,

  • July 7, 2019 at 8:50 pm
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    Thanks, M-E, Glad you’ll be there. I hear that you’re living with visible effects now . . .

    I agree with you. I think I and we should do ALL we possibly can to lessen the effects and support people. This, even if as I’m feeling, it’s not totally fixable. I seem to have settled with Jem Bendell’s formulation: that collapse is inevitable, catastrophe probable, and catastrophe possible.

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